AP Art students dig deep into psyches for portfolios

Senior+Claire+Young%27s+portfolio+explores+medical+ethnics+in+anatomy.
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AP Art students dig deep into psyches for portfolios

Senior Claire Young's portfolio explores medical ethnics in anatomy.

Senior Claire Young's portfolio explores medical ethnics in anatomy.

Senior Claire Young's portfolio explores medical ethnics in anatomy.

Senior Claire Young's portfolio explores medical ethnics in anatomy.

Julia Marques da Silva, Design Director

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Every year, AP Studio Art students each create a portfolio of 29 pieces to submit to the College Board.
A main focus in the creation of these portfolios is determining a concentration, or a theme, of the artist’s choice. Art students at Branham have considered themes such as mental health, medical ethics and literature as the basis of their portfolios.

Senior Claire Young selected the theme of medical ethics for her portfolio. Through art, Young is exploring the history of human anatomy and clinical advancements in the medical world.

“I honestly came up with it pretty quickly, but that was because I already had an interest in the topic,” said Young. “It won’t ever become irrelevant since humans will always exist and get into weird situations.”

Young plans to explore this topic by creating symbols to represent the ethics of life support. Ultimately, she wants the viewer to decide for themselves if the artwork creates a positive or negative message.

Throughout the process of creating a portfolio, art teacher Cristina Prates helps students develop their concentrations.
Prates gives students examples of themes that they can draw inspiration from.

“We are setting up a pseudo-virtual gallery of work,” said Prates.

Prates focuses on making sure students also meet deadlines and putting together their portfolio. Especially with creating multiple new pieces before the start of AP testing in May, students manage their time to be able to create the required pieces that College Board requires.

However, students have full control over what they want to present in their portfolio, which allows students to place themselves as artists in the real world. The themes that students choose for their portfolios aren’t just based off their own passions and hobbies, but also draw inspiration from their daily lives, as senior Cecilia Andreotti did.

Andreotti is exploring the concept of social isolation caused by technology, inspired by her experiences with the people around her.

“It’s kind of something I related to in my life,” said Andreotti. “A lot of people don’t talk about those things and I’m kind of using it to draw attention.”

Other students are creating their port-
folios with concentrations related to mental illness and feminism, which are
relevant to contemporary discussion.